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Growing conditions ideal at Carroll County soybean plot
 
By DEBORAH BEHRENDS
Illinois Correspondent

MILLEDGEVILLE, Ill. — Excellent growing conditions and plenty of precipitation added up to above-average soybean yields in the Farmer’s Independent Research of Seed Technologies (F.I.R.S.T.) Carroll County plot, on land owned by Steve Hollewell.

“Average soybean yields in that area were 60 to 65 bushels per acre. The average on this plot was around 82,” said F.I.R.S.T. Site Manager Jason Beyers.

He said some varieties were more than 6 feet tall. “Conditions were ideal (last) year. This plot didn’t suffer. When the area got a half-inch of rain, this plot got an inch or two,” he added.

He explained this particular land was near an old feedlot and he’s guessing manure was applied when the feedlot was in production. He noted the soil was high in phosphorus and potassium, leading him to that conclusion.

The top three varieties of the 54 different soybeans tested, in order, were Stine variety 26RD02, at 94.3 bushels per acre with an estimated gross income of $1,603 per acre; FS Hisoy HS 29A22 with 91.2 bushels and income of $1,550; and Steyer 2502R2 at 89.2 bushels and an income of $1,516.

Moisture content was high, ranging from 11-12.7 percent across the plot. Lodging was also prevalent, with an average of 68 percent.
Beyers said lodging is common when the plants are that tall. He added the stems were about the size of an average person’s thumb.

“Heavy rainfall in late July and early August matted down the leaves. It’s not really a problem in beans because they were loaded with pods and seeds were large,” Beyers said.

Farms to host 2013 F.I.R.S.T. test plots are now being selected. To obtain a corn and/or soybean application, contact General Manager Joe Bruce by email at joe.bruce@firstseedtests.com

Complete corn applications are due by Feb. 15, and soybean applications must be in by March 1.
1/23/2013