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Dry soil, weather were no barrier to a great test plot performance
 
By ANN HINCH
Associate Editor

CELINA, Ohio — Hardy soybean varieties managed to put out really good yields on a northwestern Ohio farm last year, despite almost prohibitively dry conditions, in a Farmer’s Independent Research of Seed Technologies (F.I.R.S.T.) seed trial.

The top-yielding variety in the plot – planted May 23 at 150,000 seeds per acre on the Mercer County farm of Mark Houtz, along with 44 other tested varieties – was Ebberts 2300RR2. It produced 69.6 bushels per acre with a moisture content of 13 percent and a gross income of $1,086 per acre.

The average outcome for all 45 varieties was 56.9 bushels per acre and gross income of $888, with 13 percent moisture content. They were all harvested on Nov. 9 at an average stand of 86,800 plants per acre.

Coming in second in yield was Channel variety 2800R2, at 68.2 bushels and a per-acre gross income of $1,064 (see above chart). Moisture content was 13.2 percent (of the top 30 varieties, at least, not many deviated from the 13 percent mark). The third-top yielder was Specialty variety 2812CR2 with 67.4 bushels and income of $1,051 per acre, and a moisture content of 13.1.
“This location struggled from the start,” said F.I.R.S.T. Site Manager Rich Schleuning.

“The seed was planted into dry soil and struggled to get started; final stand was well below the targeted population, but plants appeared to compensate.

“The drought put additional stress on (the plants) but the crop was able to somehow find ample moisture, based on yield levels observed (in the test).”

Houtz’s previous crop on the same soil was corn treated with Harness Xtra; the soil itself is loam that is well-drained and non-irrigated, loaded with moderate P and K and a pH of 6.5. The ground is minimally fall-tilled.

Farms to host 2013 test plots are being selected. To obtain an application, contact General Manager Joe Bruce by email at joe.bruce@firstseedtests.com

Complete corn applications are due by Feb. 15, and soybean applications must be in by March 1.
1/30/2013