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Ohio crop progress
 

Farmers finally found five fabulous days for farming. During the week ending July 13, there were that many dry days suitable for fieldwork such as baling hay and harvesting wheat.

Temperatures were slightly below normal, and rain varied from none to slightly over 3 inches, putting new meaning to the term "scattered showers." Soil moisture is adequate, but some areas are showing signs of being too dry.

At present, surface and subsurface soil moisture is still adequate or surplus in some areas. Most first-cutting hay has been harvested across the state and farmers have been taking advantage of the good weather to mow and bale their second cutting.

Wet weather in many parts of Ohio slowed planting and in some areas heavy rains and ponding meant farmers needed to replant their fields. As a result, reports from across the state show that only now is corn starting to silk and soybeans starting to bloom – slightly off from last year at this time and well behind the five-year average.

Across the state, most of the winter wheat crop has matured and harvesting is under way, well ahead of last year at this time, but slightly behind the five-year average. Although slightly behind last year at this time, most of the oat crop has started to head and harvesting is under way.

The crop conditions for pasture are rated good in most parts of the state, although lack of moisture is starting to have an impact in other areas.

By Susan Mykrantz

Ohio Correspondent

7/23/2014