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Tennessee crop progress

 

The weather had a negative effect on crops throughout the Volunteer State during the week ending July 13, according to NASS.

Standing water in fields forced some farmers to plant crops more than once, while wheat was still unharvested in some areas because of how wet fields were. Cotton in Tennessee suffered a decrease in necessary heat units because of cool weather caused by rain.

"The farmers in Fayette County had about 3 inches of rain come in Tuesday night. This caused crops to go underwater and in places, water is still in fields. Some fields have been planted three times already. The crops on higher ground look good," extension agent Jeff Via said of the week before last.

Meanwhile, other areas in the state were experiencing just the opposite. They were too dry and could use a good soaking. In any case, whether too much rain or not enough, farmers were able to get in 5.5 days of fieldwork, the report stated.

"Wheat harvest is all but wrapped up with yields ranging from 50 to 70 bushels (per acre) as a whole. The big problem has been low test weights, with several producers reporting significant dockage. A 2-inch rain stopped fieldwork and is the major reason that wheat did not get finished," said Haywood County’s Walter Battle.

"There is growing concern about cotton getting enough heat units. Just as temperatures picked up, the rain cooled it down once again basically repeating 2013. The soybean and corn crops are looking very good. Pastures are also benefiting tremendously from the rains. The good thing about the recent rains were that they for the most part was countywide."

Crops remained in fair to good condition, as they have for much of the season. Harvested wheat progress ran a little behind of where it was last year. Eighty-eight percent of the crop was harvested, compared to 97 percent in 2013 and its five-year average of 99 percent. Emerged soybeans had almost the exact same percentages.

Almost all of tobacco had been transplanted, at 90 percent, compared to being totally transplanted a year ago. Squaring cotton progress was at 74 percent, just 2 points behind its five-year average, and silking corn was at 78 percent, ahead of last year when it was at 73 percent, according to NASS.

"Warm, dry weather helped producers to complete wheat harvest and soybean planting this week. A surprise thunderstorm on Tuesday morning (July 8) left varying amounts of 1/10-inch to 6/10-inch across the county. Upland corn looks excellent at this point, as do full-season soybeans. Forage producers are taking advantage of good drying conditions and have started harvesting their second cutting of hay," stated Jeff Lannom of Weakley County.

Topsoil moisture levels in the Volunteer State were rated 3 percent very short, 24 percent short, 68 percent adequate and 5 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels were rated 3 percent very short, 21 percent short, 70 percent adequate and 6 percent surplus.

By Tesa Nauman

Tennessee Correspondent

7/23/2014