Search Site   
Current News Stories
Climate report forecasts economic risks by 2100
Fluctuating feeder cattle prices perplexing agriculture analysts
Warren County home to Ohio’s largest registered farm of yaks
Agronomist urging farmers to take more scientific approach
Former ag secretary to kick off Indy Tech Expo
Indiana farmer plans 2019 driverless planting demos
IBM supercomputing and AI moving more into agriculture
Farmers can learn hedging tips and advice during Expo session
Speakers to demystify use of cover crops for healthy soils
Programs helping accelerate the future of farm technology
Marquis: 2020 lock closures to be challenge for Illinois ethanol
   
News Articles
Search News  
   
Checkoff Report - May 23, 2018
 

Appell inducted into National Pork Hall of Fame

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Jill Appell, a pork producer from Altona, Ill., was inducted into the Hall of Fame of the National Pork Producers Council for her leadership of and dedication to the U.S. pork industry, at NPPC's annual business meeting, the National Pork Industry Forum.

Appell, who grew up near Chicago, early on developed an interest in agriculture. Her career in the pork industry began when she joined the Knox County Pork Producers Assoc., which eventually led to her role as president of the Illinois Pork Producers Assoc.

Shortly after NPPC was formally separated from the National Pork Board, she joined the NPPC board and was appointed vice president of the organization in 2005. She served as president from March 2007-March 2008. Prior to becoming president of NPPC, Appell was appointed as director of Rural Development for Illinois.

She has continued her service to the pork industry through her role as vice chair on the Advisory Committee for Trade Policy and Negotiation for the U.S. Trade Representative, and has served on the Illinois Attorney General's Advisory Committee and the Illinois Governor's Advisory Committee. Appell and her husband Paul originally had a farrow-to-finish operation, then transitioned to a weaner operation. While they no longer have pigs, they still raise 1,100 acres of corn and soybeans.

 

5/24/2018