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Checkoff Report - June 13, 2018
 

Appell inducted into National Pork Hall of Fame

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Jill Appell, a pork producer from Altona, Ill., was inducted into the Hall of Fame of the National Pork Producers Council for her leadership of and dedication to the U.S. pork industry, at NPPC's annual business meeting, the National Pork Industry Forum.

Appell, who grew up near Chicago, early on developed an interest in agriculture. Her career in the pork industry began when she joined the Knox County Pork Producers Assoc., which eventually led to her role as president of the Illinois Pork Producers Assoc.

Shortly after NPPC was formally separated from the National Pork Board, she joined the NPPC board and was appointed vice president of the organization in 2005. She served as president from March 2007-March 2008. Prior to becoming president of NPPC, Appell was appointed as director of Rural Development for Illinois.

She has continued her service to the pork industry through her role as vice chair on the Advisory Committee for Trade Policy and Negotiation for the U.S. Trade Representative, and has served on the Illinois Attorney General's Advisory Committee and the Illinois Governor's Advisory Committee. Appell and her husband Paul originally had a farrow-to-finish operation, then transitioned to a weaner operation. While they no longer have pigs, they still raise 1,100 acres of corn and soybeans.

6/14/2018