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Champion corn persists despite weather swings at Michigan sites
 
By SHELLY STRAUTZ-SPRINGBORN
Michigan Correspondent

BRECKENRIDGE, Mich. — Varying growing conditions didn’t hurt yields during all-season tests by Farmer’s Independent Research of Seed Technologies (F.I.R.S.T.) on two farms in central Michigan.
An average of 185.8 bushels of corn per acre was the result of the test on Josh Humm’s farm in Breckenridge, Gratiot County. The top finisher was Channel variety 197-67VT3P, using Genuity VT Triple PRO technology, with 215.4 bushels per acre and a gross income of $1,565 per acre.

Rupp variety xr8264 produced 208.9 bushels per acre with a gross income of $1,530 per acre, while G2 Genetics 5H-399 yielded 210.5 bushels and had a gross income of $1,528. Rounding out the top five slots were Rupp xrT94-06, which yielded 208.9 bushels with a gross income of $1,526 and NuTech 5N-001, at 210 bushels and a gross income of $1,521.

Although many areas in Michigan struggled with weather conditions varying from an early and warm spring to summer drought, F.I.R.S.T. Site Manager Rich Schleuning said these conditions were not an issue for this plot.

“The season’s drought and high temperatures were not an issue here,” he reported. “The crop was planted later, but got off to a good start with uniform emergence.”

According to Schleuning, the crop pollinated after the high temperatures in late June. “Nice grain quality with good kernel depth made for an easy shell. This was just a nice plot,” he noted.
At harvest, the average moisture for all 45 varieties tested was 19.7 percent. The estimated gross income per acre was an average of $1,353.

The crop was planted May 17 at a rate of 34,000 seeds per acre and harvested Oct. 26 at a rate of 32,400 plants per acre using conventional tillage on the sandy loam, non-irrigated soil. The previous crop were soybeans treated with glyphosate.

Another test plot in neighboring Saginaw County yielded well despite excessive moisture throughout the growing season and at harvest time. An average yield of 177.9 bushels per acre was the result of the test on John Wartz’s farm near Freeland.

“In late July, the area got 12 inches of rain in one day with timely rainfall the remainder of the season,” Schleuning reported. “It took two attempts to harvest this location. Standing water made the first attempt impossible.”

The top producer was Channel 197-67VT3P, using Genuity VT Triple PRO technology, with 208.5 bushels per acre. NuTech 5N-001 produced 202.5 bushels and Renk RK585VT3P yielded 198.8 bushels. NuTech 5N-197 and G2 Genetics 5Z-198 also produced well, with 198.5 and 193.3 bushels per acre, respectively.
The estimated gross income for the 45 varieties tested was an average of $1,398 per acre. The top-yielding five varieties listed above averaged $1,631, $1,583, $1,565, $1,556 and $1,522 respectively.

The test stand was planted May 18 at a rate of 33,000 seeds per acre and harvested Oct. 25 at 30,800 plants per acre. The no-till field was non-irrigated, well-drained sandy clay loam soil. The previous crop were soybeans treated with glyphosate.

“We were so glad to harvest this location before Hurricane Sandy hit this area. Plant health and grain quality were excellent, with no diseases present,” Schleuning reported.
12/5/2012