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Campus Chatter - Jan. 2, 2013
 
OSU Agronomics Team offer 
Certified Crop Adviser exam prep
SIDNEY, Ohio — People planning to take the Certified Crop Adviser exam can gain testing insight through a two-day CCA exam preparation session taught by members of Ohio State University Extension’s Agronomic Crops Team.

The course is designed to help participants understand the principles necessary to become a certified crop adviser and to assist in preparation for the state and international CCA exams, said Harold Watters, an OSU Extension agronomy field specialist and coordinator of the university’s Agronomic Crops Team. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.

While the exam preparation class wasn’t created to be a “crash course” covering all information on the CCA exam, the training session will offer participants information on performance objectives and provide direction for independent study, he said.

“Crop advisers are the folks who provide advice to producers on nutrient management, crop management, pest management, and managing soil and water issues,” Watters said. “So the more certified crop advisers we have, the better advice we can get out to our growers.

“And if we can give those who are interested in becoming certified crop advisers a little boost in exam preparation that helps them become more confident to get in there and take those exams, then the better. The class is only two days, so while it’s not enough time to teach everything on the test, we can help provide confidence and tips to prepare them for some of the tougher questions on the exam.”

The sessions will be offered at the Shelby County office of OSU Extension, 810 Fair Road, in Shelby.

All sessions will be taught by CCAs who are also all OSU Extension county educators and state specialists and will include the following topics:

Crop management, with an emphasis on crop production, photosynthesis, crop physiology and variety selection, taught by Watters. 

Soil and water management, with an emphasis on soil properties, soil water, surface and ground water, and soil and wind erosion, taught by Bruce Clevenger. 

Pest management, with an emphasis on weeds, insects, diseases and pesticides, taught by Greg LaBarge. 

Primary nutrients, secondary nutrients and micronutrients, taught by Robert Mullen. 

A sample exam and sample exam review. 

Participants will also receive the Ohio Agronomy Guide; Ohio and Indiana Weed Control Guide; Corn, Soybean, Wheat and Alfalfa Field Guide; and the IPNI 4R Plant Nutrition Manual.

Registration for the event is $225 per person and includes the preparation sessions, lunches and handouts. The deadline to register for the two-day event is Jan. 9.

Registration can be made online at http://www.reg
online.com/CCAPrep

UK College of Ag inducts Hall of Distinguished Alumni 
LEXINGTON, Ky. — Five distinguished graduates of the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture were inducted Dec. 14 into the inaugural class of the Hall of Distinguished Alumni. Fifteen posthumous recipients will also be named.

This year’s inductees are Louis J. Boyd, Maurice Cook, David Switzer, Harold Workman and Joe Wright. These honorees have had outstanding careers and continue to serve as important members of their fields and in their communities. 

For nearly 150 years, extraordinary alumni from College of Agriculture have contributed substantially to their chosen fields, their communities and society. To pay homage to these and future distinguished graduates, the college initiated the Hall of Distinguished Alumni. This award is the highest honor the college will bestow. The college’s alumni association spearheaded the formation of this award.

“The Ag and HES Alumni Association is excited to support the establishment of the College of Agriculture Hall of Distinguished Alumni,” said Bill McCloskey, alumni association president.
Boyd of Bogart, Ga., began his 41-year career of service to animal agriculture as an extension specialist at UK before moving on to distinguish himself at the University of Tennessee, Michigan State University and the University of Georgia. Under his leadership, external funding for Georgia’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and Agricultural Experiment Station increased more than four fold. He was instrumental in building the UGA alumni association and college development activities. Throughout his career, he was a mentor to students, student clubs and teams.

Cook, a world-renowned expert in soil and water conservation and a leader in the field of soil science, taught at North Carolina State University for more than 30 years before his retirement in 1992 at the rank of professor. He also served as the director of the North Carolina Division of Soil and Water where he initiated the first-in-the-nation soil and water conservation cost-share program for farmers. Cook also served as senior advisor for agricultural affairs for the state, representing the governor throughout the state and the world on issues of better soil and water conservation management.

Switzer of Lexington is recognized worldwide for his extensive knowledge, experience and accomplishments relating to the horse breeding and racing industries. In addition, he is an acknowledged expert in the field of equine foundation bloodstock and insurance, having owned and operated a bloodstock agency for many years. He promotes the Kentucky Thoroughbred industries locally, nationally and internationally. He played a vital communications role during the Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome crisis in 2001-2002 and led efforts to create an emergency response team from state government and the industry should another such event occur. 

Workman of Louisville currently serves as president and chief executive officer for the Kentucky State Fair Board. Thanks to his efforts, the Kentucky Exposition Center is home to several signature events including the North American International Livestock Exposition, the largest purebred livestock show in the world and the National Farm Machinery Show, which ranks as one of Louisville’s top attractions each year generating more than $20 million in annual economic impact.  Also under this leadership, the exposition center has been transformed to one of the 10 largest facilities of its type with more than 1.2 million square feet of indoor space.

Wright, a Harned farmer and implement dealer, served as state senator for 16 years and Senate majority leader for 11 years, during which time he helped support the purchase of the college’s Woodford County farm and spearheaded efforts to secure funding for additional college building needs. 
1/2/2013