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Super Bowl shows yet again, not everyone can be a winner
 
Although there were some great commercials that aired during the 2013 Super Bowl, I would like to shine light on what may not ever be discussed in the living rooms throughout the world. The fact is, one Harbaugh won and one Harbaugh lost.

Yes – having brothers Jim and John Harbaugh battle it out on the gridiron with teams of highly-paid, talented, grown men made for a great week of personal interest stories at every turn. We were able to catch a glimpse of the entire Harbaugh family as they allowed us into their lives.

Even Jim’s and John’s parents conveyed how they felt having their boys duke it out in the biggest game of the year. The father, Jack, plainly said it was one of the toughest games he ever had to watch because he knew one of his sons had to lose. And Mrs. Harbaugh confessed she would really rather have it end in a tie … the quintessential “mom” response.

But in the end, after days of preparation, a hard-fought game and a history-making power outage, when the time ran out there was one winner and one loser – and that’s okay.

When the brothers approached their middle-of-the-field congratulatory handshake, with every step, John agonized over shaking the hand of his brother, who lost. It was tough for both of them, but they handled it well and exchanged brotherly sentiments. The Ravens ran around on the field celebrating their victory while the 49ers hung their heads in defeat. And this is how a contest ends – with winners and losers. Not everyone left feeling great. Not everyone left with a trophy. Not everyone left with a dazzling ring. Not everyone left a winner. Somewhere along the way, the rest of the nation needs to re-adopt the “winning” and “losing” mentality.
Everyone is not a winner; there is no level playing field and hard work and determination will sometimes leave you just short of the goal line. But it’s still okay. Every one of us needs to learn how to lose as well as win. Where is the sweet taste of victory if there are no losers?

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve sat on a selection committee that was supposed to pick a winner, but instead the rest of the committee would say, “Let’s give everyone an award; they all deserve it.” Or, the number of soccer games I’ve watched as little children ran their legs off only to find out – everyone wins. Yay!
Do you really think if Jim Harbaugh’s 49ers had won, he would have wanted to share his Super Bowl trophy with his brother, John? No. They both wanted to win, but neither one of them would be willing to share the trophy, brothers or no.

In our “let’s not keep score” world of everyone wins, everyone gets a trophy and there are no losers, I’d like to thank the NFL and the entire sports world for continuing to harbor competition and rewarding only the winners. Like it or not, competition is a good thing. Winning is a great thing. But the agony of defeat is what will push us to strive for the thrill of victory.

The views and opinions expressed in this column are those of the author and not necessarily those of Farm World. Those with questions or comments for Melissa Hart may write to her in care of this publication.
2/13/2013