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Old-iron enthusiasts welcome at Huber Machinery Museum
 
The Huber Machinery Museum in Marion, Ohio, is an appropriate stop for lovers of antique equipment and vehicles because it is dedicated to the company started by Edward Huber – who created the revolving hayrake and a myriad of other inventions over the years.

The Huber Machinery Co. eventually built tractors and went into the construction industry as well. The Marion museum contains examples of Huber’s steam and gasoline tractors, threshers and road-building equipment.

Perhaps one of the most exciting items is the wood revolving hayrake, Huber’s first invention. One of the wooden hayrakes sits in the entrance of the museum, surrounded by a case of Huber items. The hayrake that began it all was manufactured in Marion as early as 1865, just as the Civil War was winding down.

Recently retired curator Anna May Schwaderer said both of these items were originally made by Huber and sent to Washington, D.C., then sent back to him. The items were donated by a Huber family member.

Besides the car collectors, many individuals and groups come to this museum. “We average about 2,500 visitors a year,” Anna May said.

While many of the displays in the museum – which has two sections, the front with company history and memorabilia on display, and the rear with machinery – stay the same, each year management rotates the displays in one of the cases. Anna May noted, “This year, we featured companies Huber was associated with.”

Museum board member James Boblenz said one of the important aspects about it is farming history.

Part of the collection in the museum represents agriculture from horses to tractor power.

“There used to be 40- to 60-acre farms where farmers raised all their livestock and used steam power. Today, taking young people on a tour (with today’s electronics), and nothing comparable like a pressure cooker, et cetera, it is hard to explain steam power.”
The members of the Huber museum put it together with donations.
“This museum was built 100 percent on collections from friends, family and a few partial grants that were used for blacktop and to repair the steam shovel that sits out front of the museum,” James said.

He is a toy collector, and pointed out several of the unique toys at the museum that included a road roller with a single front wheel, and some rare aluminum cast toys made by Yoder. The Amish family created a few toys until because of an accident, they ceased production.

There was also an Ertl Model L and patent samples, along with an intricate constructed wooden shovel model.

With a popcorn museum, President Harding’s home and memorial and many other stops, Marion itself is also a great place to visit when checking out the Huber museum. Open on Saturday afternoons, the museum is located at 220 E. Fairground St., Marion, OH 43302; call 740-387-9233 for details.

Also, visit the Marion visitors site on Facebook to see what’s happening at www.facebook.com/VisitMarionOhio

Readers with questions or comments for Cindy Ladage may write to her in care of this publication.
8/22/2013