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Ohio crop progress

 

Corn and soybean progress is steady in Ohio with some concerns about stunted growth in some parts of the state, according to the NASS Great Lakes region office.

Jason Hartschuh, program coordinator in Ohio State University extension, Crawford County, said the north-central part of the state is showing dry conditions, while weather overall has been variable.

"In Crawford County we have corn that is probably 80 percent tasseled and doing well, and we have 15 to 20 percent that was later and will be tasseling within a week or two," Hartschuh said. "Soybeans are looking good. We’re looking for August rains to finish crop development."

Lack of rain could significantly lessen yields in the north-central and northwestern parts of the state, he said. In some areas, he said corn is starting to curl and soybeans are starting to show dry stress.

"August rains are going to be crucial for soybeans," he said, "and take corn from an average crop to an excellent crop." He also noted there are more weeds in the crop than usual this year, possibly due to wet weather this spring that reduced the effectiveness of post-emergent herbicides.

Overall, NASS reports corn condition was 76 percent good to excellent, compared to 80 percent at this time last year, and soybean condition was 70 percent good to excellent, which is the same as last year.

NASS reports there were 5.6 days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending Aug. 3. Average temperatures ranged from 65-71 degrees, which is about 10 below normal. The lowest recorded temperature was 46 degrees and the highest was 87. The statewide average was 67.6, which is 4.7 degrees cooler than normal.

Recorded precipitation ranged widely from 0.06-3.95 inches, with a statewide average of 1.06 inches. Rain was scattered, with some regions reporting heavy rainstorms and others reporting dry ground.

Soybean stands are continuing to flower and set pods. Most corn plants have continued silking, and are beginning to dough.

By Vicki Johnson

Ohio Correspondent

8/13/2014