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Indiana Beef Evaluation Program sells 226 bulls
The 57th test of the Indiana Beef Evaluation Program finished March 20. A total of 226 bulls from eleven breeds completed the test.

The bulls were entered by 78 seedstock producers from Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin. Bulls were fed a moderate-energy ration during the 125-day test and daily gain for the entire group was 3.60 pounds. The bulls are in ideal body condition for use this spring.

Quality is high in this set of bulls. C Bar Cattle Co. Inc., Owensville, Ind. consigned the top sale indexing bull, Angus No. 129, which will lead off the sale. Bull No. 129 ranks in the upper 25 percent of his breed for weight per day of age, scrotal circumference and percent retail product. His Expected Progeny Differences (EPDs) are in the top 25 percent of his breed for birth weight, direct and maternal calving ease, maternal milk, percent intramuscular fat and also $W and $G indexes. Bull No. 129 was sired by Bon View New Design 1407.

Other bulls with superior balanced traits for performance and carcass merit that will sell early in the sale include: Angus No. 73 from Stewart Select Angus, LLC, Greensburg, Ind.; Angus No. 113 from Wessel Angus, Trafalgar, Ind.; Angus No. 154 from Grubbs Angus Farms, Hillsboro, Ind.; Hereford No. 160 from Able Acres, Wingate, Ind.; Simmental No. 62 from Bill Washburn, Olney, Ill.; Shorthorn No. 66 from NP Farm, Pekin, Ind.; Angus No. 103 from Dan Watkins, Middletown, Ind.; Angus No. 77 from Stewart Select Angus, LLC, Greensburg, Ind.; and Hereford No. 162 from Able Acres, Wingate, Ind.. These 10 bulls had test performance indexes that ranged from 103.2 to 119.6.

Cattle producers looking for bulls that will add pounds, quality and value to their calves will not want to miss the sale and video auction at 6 p.m. on Thursday, April 13 at the Springville Feeder Auction in Springville, Ind. In addition, bulls can be viewed and purchased at five video sites.

Video sites will be at the Tippecanoe County Extension Office, Lafayette; the Parke County Extension Office, Rockville; the Clark County Extension Office, Charlestown; the Fulton County Fairgrounds, Rochester; and the NRCS Office, Lawrenceburg, Ky. A total of 137 bulls will be offered for sale (101 Angus, nine Simmental, seven Charolais, six Hereford, four SimAngus, three Shorthorn, two Composite, two Gelbvieh Balancer, two Red Angus and one Gelbvieh).

These 137 bulls were the top indexing bulls of their breed and passed a rigorous inspection for breeding and structural soundness. Also, all bulls have been measured by ultrasound for ribeye area, backfat and percent intramuscular fat (marbling). In addition, EPD’s for birth weight, weaning weight, yearling weight, maternal milk, calving ease, carcass traits and $ indexes are available to assist producers in bull selection.

IBEP bulls have sired a high percentage of the more than 4,500 head of steer and heifer calves in the IBEEF program during the past nine years. These calves have excelled in feedlot performance.

Bulls may be seen at the Test Station, located at the Feldun-Purdue Ag. Center, 3 miles northwest of Bedford on State Roads 158 and 458 or after 3 p.m. on April 13 at the Springville Feeder Auction.

For additional information, contact a county extension educator or Donna Lofgren, 765-494-6439; Barbara Probasco, 765-494-4843; Kern Hendrix, 765-494-4832; or Richard Huntrods, Station Manager, 812-279-8554.

Also, complete performance data and photos of sale bulls can be viewed at the website www.ansc.purdue.edu/ibep

The sale catalog is online, and includes a feature that allows users to search for bulls, which meet their selection criteria.

This farm news was published in the April 5, 2006 issue of Farm World.

4/5/2006